Transforming stop and search in Scotland

Researchers: Dr Kath Murray Professor Susan McVie During the course of our research on crime and victimisation, the eight Scottish police forces were merged into one single force in April 2013. During its early phase, Police Scotland faced significant criticism over its use of stop and search which was found to be significantly higher than other comparative jurisdictions. During a

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Social inequalities in graduates’ occupational destinations

This project aimed to assess whether and to what extent social inequalities in early occupational destinations among graduates exist. In a comparative framework, we asked whether the effect of social origin on graduates’ occupational attainment differs between Germany and the UK, two distinct institutional settings in terms of education system and labour market structure. We asked further whether social inequalities

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Education systems and labour market pathways

This project focused on the link between different education systems and labour market pathways, taking into account historic trends and recent developments. The first study analysed the role of macro-level features of educational systems in the production of specific individual career patterns and labour market pathways in 13 European countries. It aimed to shed light on processes of cumulative (dis-)advantage

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Social inequalities in higher education retention

This project aimed to assess whether there is an association between social class and retention, and, if so, whether this effect can be explained by the choice of field of study or choice of institution. Does the attendance at different higher education institutions and the study of different curricula affect the progression of people from different social groups? Is the

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Crime and the era of ‘big data’

In this current era of ‘big data’, crime data poses both opportunities and challenges for data scientists and crime analysts. The wealth of data available at increasingly small spatial scales provides good opportunities for better understanding the relationship between crime and place; while investment in data linkage infrastructure is allowing us to examine the connection between crime and a host

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New methodological approaches within criminology

A key aim of AQMeN was to develop new methodologies using quantitative data. Within the crime and victimisation strand, we have developed several projects using crime data that have made a significant contribution to methodological development within the field of criminology. Further details of these projects are given below. (1) Modelling Escalation in Crime Seriousness (Francis and Liu) Latent variable

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Changing crime concentrations in neighbourhoods in City of Glasgow

Existing international research has found that crime ‘typically’ concentrates and persists at a small number of micro-locations and, in so doing, has supported the development of effective and efficient place-based policing initiatives. This research set out to question whether, in an era of falling crime, the spatial scale and urban patterning of crime density has remained stable or exhibited change.

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Comparing trends in crime across local authorities in Britain

This research examines change in crime at a regional level across Britain. Existing work on regional crime trends has tended to focus on simple mapping or cross-sectional analysis; but there has been very little published work on longitudinal change at a regional level. In addition, there are gaps in knowledge about relative change in crime trends across UK jurisdictions, especially

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