The view from the continent: what people in other member states think about the UK’s EU referendum

This project, which took place between October 2015 and March 2016, focused on public attitudes across different EU member states regarding the June 2016 referendum in the UK about its membership of the European Union. The team carrying out the research comprised Dr Jan Eichhorn, Dr Daniel Kenealy and Christine Hübner from the University of Edinburgh School of Social and

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Has Scotland’s falling crime rate benefited everyone equally?

Crime has fallen nationally, but this research by Susan McVie, Paul Norris and Rebecca Pillinger aims to establish whether crime has fallen to the same extent within all local authority areas and the extent to which there is variation between areas. Using small area level police recorded crime data, this project investigates the differences in crime trends across local communities

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Local differences in the crime drop: are there winners and losers?

AQMeN research briefing 3 reports on a preliminary investigation of local differences during the drop in crime in the Greater Glasgow area between 2004 and 2010/11. In recent years, a crime drop has been identified in the United States and across much of Europe. A similar trajectory of falling crime has also been identified in Scotland. Typically, attention has focused

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Where have all the young offenders gone?

In this research briefing paper, AQMeN doctoral student Ben Matthews explores why the crime drop that has happened in Scotland since the early 1990s is not evenly distributed among offenders. There has been a substantial decline in the rate of convictions of people aged 25 or under, in particular young men, whereas, by contrast, rates of convictions for people over

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Education, social attitudes and social participation among adults in Britain

A stable finding of research on civic participation is the correlation between overall educational attainment and various attributes that are relevant to democracy, such as propensity to be active, to vote, and to hold views on important public issues. But research since the 1990s has suggested that we should be cautious about this inference. The most important question is that

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Subject choice and inequalities in access to Higher Education: Comparing Scotland and Ireland

AQMeN research briefing 7. Cristina Iannelli and Markus Klein summarise their recent study which compares the Scottish and Irish education systems. This research analyses the association between school curricula, examination results and university entrance requirements and social inequalities in Higher Education. Key points: • There are significant social inequalities in access to Higher Education in Scotland and Ireland. However, the

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The impact of social origin on graduates’ early occupational destinations – An Anglo-German comparison.

This journal article examines the impact of social origin on tertiary graduates’ labour market outcomes in Germany and the United Kingdom, two distinct countries in terms of higher education systems, labour market structures, and their linkages. Data from the 2005 REFLEX survey, OLS regression and linear probability models are used to analyse the effect of parental education on graduates’ occupational

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Why education matters for democracy

AQMeN Research Briefing 11 – Why education matters for democracy – looks at the connection between an individual’s education and their likelihood of participating in democracy. Key points: Education is the basis of democracy. People need skills and knowledge to be able to take part in civic life and to debate big political issues with each other. There are now

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